Take the Health Pledge Healthy Eating Healthy Kids
Get Fit GP Community Partners Fitness Resources in Grand Prairie Get Fit Videos

November is National Diabetes Awareness Month!

According to the American Diabetes Association, Approximately 30 million children and adults have diabetes in the United States. Out of that number, nearly 95% have type 2 diabetes. Sadly, the problem is even greater for minority and ethnic populations.

CDC Diabetes Statistics

Type 1 Diabetes:

Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed in children and young adults, and was previously known as juvenile diabetes. Only 5% of people with diabetes have this form of the disease.

In type 1 diabetes, the body does not produce insulin. The body breaks down the sugars and starches you eat into a simple sugar called glucose, which it uses for energy. Insulin is a hormone that the body needs to get glucose from the bloodstream into the cells of the body. With the help of insulin therapy and other treatments, even young children can learn to manage their condition and live long, healthy lives.

Type 2 Diabetes:

Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. If you have type 2 diabetes your body does not use insulin properly. This is called insulin resistance. At first, your pancreas makes extra insulin to make up for it. But, over time it isn't able to keep up and can't make enough insulin to keep your blood glucose at normal levels.

Types of Diabetes

What You Should Know

You are at increased risk for developing prediabetes and type 2 diabetes if you:

  • Are 45 years of age or older.
  • Are overweight.
  • Have a parent with diabetes.
  • Have a sister or brother with diabetes.
  • Have a family background that is African-American, Hispanic/Latino, American-Indian, Asian-American, or Pacific-Islander.
  • Had diabetes while pregnant (gestational diabetes), or gave birth to a baby weighing 9 pounds or more.
  • Are physically active less than three times a week.

What You Can Do

Research shows that modest weight loss and regular physical activity can help prevent or delay type 2 diabetes by up to 58% in people with prediabetes. Modest weight loss means 5% to 7% of body weight, which is 10 to 14 pounds for a 200-pound person. Getting at least 150 minutes each week of physical activity, such as brisk walking, also is important. (View Top 10 List: Great Places to Take a Walk in Grand Prairie.)

Couple walking the trails at West Lynn Creek Park on Joe Pool Lake

Source: American Diabetes Association, CDC